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Covering frames for solar cells used in photovoltaic systems on residential roofs

We design and produce covering frames used in solar cell modules on building roofs. In joining forces with one of the world’s largest manufacturers of roof tiles, we obtained a patent for our frame. A covering frame that was once painstakingly made – one at a time, by hand – is something we now produce on an industrial scale. As a result, installing and expanding solar cells on residential roofs carries a much lower price tag.

The solar cells, which are later joined with their covering frames, are produced in the world’s most high-tech factories. Our frames are made of lacquered aluminium rails and use profiles to support the cells and make them airtight. Thanks to our long track record in joining technology as well as glass and metal, we know precisely how to adhere glass panels that are dampened with laminate film and feature a silicon substrate. Our expertise in this area is partly shaped by producing the oven doors for one of the world’s largest manufacturers of commercial-grade ovens.

Expertise from several angles

Our covering frames perfectly reflect our sweeping expertise in design, laser cutting, edging and welding. When our customer commissioned us to develop this product, their engineers were amazed at our capabilities. "I wouldn’t have even dared to draw what Wurster manufactured,” confessed one designer.

Wurster covering frames come in three sizes: 45 x 91 cm, 53 x 129 cm and 72.5 x 145 cm. So no matter what kind of roofs builders are faced with, they can – almost always – work a photovoltaic system for capturing solar energy into their plans.
 

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Covering frames for solar cell modules. Our frames are made of lacquered aluminium rails and use profiles to support the cells and make them airtight.


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Modules and matching covering frames can either be integrated into the roof or constitute an entire roof. A covering frame that was once painstakingly made – one at a time, by hand – is something we now produce on an industrial scale.